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Shows and Congresses
2014 VISION Congress PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 25 November 2014

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In the report, we explain and comment on the main innovations and topics presented at this VISION 2014 Congress. This year's lectures, posters, night-drive demonstrations, booths, and technological presentations all combined to make VISION an exceptional congress on new technologies with emphasis on the unprecedented speed and preoliferation of new and newly-mature technologies and techniques. Around 450 people attended.

Presentation topics covered in the report include:
• Adaptive light systems, evolving very fast in lockstep with ever-more-advanced cameras and sensors for adaptive systems;
• Systems combining new LEDs with new optics as well as lasers;
• Driver assistance systems increasingly combining ADAS and lighting.

The report also includes pictures and information concerning the exhibitions which emphasise the progress of automotive lighting systems. We also cover the drive night tests, with the main points:
• Performance differential with HID, LED, and ADB is such that driving at night in bad weather with legal halogen headlamps can legitimately be considered dangerous;
• LED headlamps have evolved significantly since the 2012 demonstration, and can produce a good light effectively equal to HID in terms of coverage and beam flux.
• Glare-free high beam is at long last a dependable, high-performance feature which permits maximum possible seeing range at all times for the driver, even in traffic—and the resolution of the systems in the pipeline keeps getting better.
You'll also find pictures of this VISION 2014 lighting community gathering around 450 people during 2 days and one night, talking about automotive lighting. Give it a look!

 
2014 Mondial Paris Autoshow PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 28 October 2014

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In contrast to the 2012 version of the Paris Mondial show two years ago, the concept and production cars unveiled at 2014's show strongly put forth the message that the automotive crisis in Europe is now behind us. The five takeaway points we retain from our visit are:

1. Most new production cars in the premium and middle ranges are now using LEDs at the front and rear.

2. To create visual distinction in the front from HID, the LED headlamps tend to use groups of lenses with square, rectangular, and other non-round contours. The big round projector module is being supplanted. Headlamp heights are decreasing in concept cars, also to some degree in new production models. The constraint of the ø70mm lens has been removed by LEDs.

3. We're definitely seeing industry-wide use of DRL and rear lamp design to emphasise styling differentiation and reinforce brand signature. Full red/white light bars or light guides are used more and more, emphasising the brand signature.

Left to right: Audi, BMW, Infiniti, Lexus

4. A trend unveiled in several concept cars is fully-red (rear) or fully-white (front) perfectly homogeneous functional light blocks, using new materials and techniques.

Left to right: Honda, DS, Peugeot

5. We see a proliferation of the ADB, adaptive driving beam or glare-free high beam. All the premium cars and also the middle range cars now use this technology and communicate on it.

Left to right: Audi, Volkswagen, BMW

 
DVN Seoul Workshop PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 22 July 2014

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The 9 th DVN Workshop was held at Seoul, South Korea on 24–25 June with 200 attendees from automakers, tier-1 and -2 suppliers, researchers, regulators, and individuals who develop, build, specify, and regulate vehicle lighting around the world.

DVN asked worldwide experts to share their vision, predictions, and desires about automotive lighting technologies in the 2020-25 timeframe, including specificities in Asia. Twenty-two exceptionally stimulating presentations and five round table panel discussions illustrated how each contributor sees the technology and how they might be focusing their choices on investments in engineering, materials, people, and production.

In every presentation, a common thread confirmed the consensus outcomes of the Paris workshop: automotive lighting has dramatically changed over the years, the rate of change is accelerating, and its future will become more complex and interesting with styles continuing to become more diverse and innovative. Today in 2014, design and creative styling are already greatly influencing how lighting will be engineered and in many cases, posing a significant engineering challenge to incorporate the visual cues of the design and deliver it to production.


Session 1.
Experts from Audi and Hyundai Motors shared their visions, concerns, and views of lighting innovation with emphasis on the fast and significant change and growth in this technology.

Session 2 was primarily focused on five tier-1 suppliers: AL, Varroc, SL, IHL, and Mobis. They explained how the s peed of innovation will continue to increase, challenging everyone in terms of resources, cost, time to market, and legislation. Static LED ADB Systems for glare-free high beam is the trend and the preferred solution for the future, though regulatory barriers remain (notably in North America). Proliferation of new light sources such as OLED and laser on top of numerous LED sources will lead to an ever-growing complexity which should lead to a standardisation of modules.

Session 3 centred around LED manufactures. Each shared a prediction of how LED light sources will evolve and grow in sophistication, and how they must stay in step with the fast pace of design that keeps pushing innovation and product uniqueness. Nichia, Osram, Philips, and Seoul SC as well as the University of Hannover's HOT touched on LED package designs, intelligent light sources, the challenges of laser diodes, and the significant interest in their possibilities.
Session 4 dealt with simulations, particularly emphasising the huge possibilities for simulation work and development to countervail the tendency of new technologies and techniques to lengthen the development cycle.

Session 5 started with presentations from AML Systems and Docter Optics, DEKRA and LMT. Following these, GTB President Geoff Draper made an excellent and visionary presentation about the challenges of international regulatory harmonisation. He warned of possible organisational changes which could affect regulatory processes and outlined the critical needs that must be addressed urgently before closing the session with a panel discussion.
This report summarises all the presentations and the round tables. The reader is referred to the original lecture slides. The innovative systems, products, and components discussed during the Workshop are summarised herein.  

 
2014 Geneva International Motor Show PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 07 April 2014

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In contrast with last year, considering all the concept cars and new models unveiled, 2014's Geneva auto show strongly put forth the message that fun is ahead and the automotive crisis in Europe is now behind us.  While IAA Frankfurt focuses on German cars and NAIAS Detroit focuses on American cars, the Geneva show is different because no cars are produced in Switzerland. But this is definitely a show meant for European buyers.The eight takeaway points we retain from our visit are:

1. The 2014 edition is partly focused on small cars like Toyota's Aygo, Peugeot's 108, Citroën's C1, Renault's Twingo 3, and the Opel Adam Rocks, all meant to attract new customers towards a first experience with a brand.

2. Most new production cars' premium headlamps, if available, are HIDs. We saw only relatively few new cars equipped with LED headlamps, and those were mainly premium cars like Audi, Mercedes, and Lexus models.

3. To create visual distinction from HID, the LED headlamps on offer use lenses with square, rectangular, and special contours.

4. Headlamp heights are decreasing in concept cars, also to some degree in new production models.

5. We're definitely seeing industry-wide use of DRL and rear lamp design to emphasise styling differentiation and reinforce brand signature.

Left to right: Mercedes, Audi, Mini, Volvo

6. The number of light source locations is increasing and we frequently see multi-level light sources on the front end (such as 3 levels on Citroën Cactus and Jeep Cherokee).

7. A trend unveiled in several concept cars is fully-red (rear) or fully-white (front) perfectly homogeneous functional light blocks, using new materials and techniques.

Left to Right–
Top: Honda Type R front & rear, Hyundai Intrado, Mitsubishi Concept XR-PHEV
Bottom: Mitsubishi Concept AR & GC-PHEV, Pininfarina Gran Lusso, SsangYong XLV Concept.

8. All concept cars use LED light blocks or light jewels with smaller functional light sources to save room or to introduce decorative items. The big projector module is yesterday's style.
Good examples are on the Subaru WISIV2 and Toyota FCV:

 
DVN workshop shanghai 2013 PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 07 May 2013

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In April 2013, the first workshop in China became the seventh in the onrunning series of DVN workshops—joining Stuttgart, Paris, Detroit, and Tokyo on the growing list of productive, fruitful workshops.
It was held in a wonderful location, the JC Mandarin hotel in Shanghai. The event was a smashing success, well attended by 250 experts, most of them Chinese, from all sectors of the lighting community. The 70 pages of this report will brief you on the exchange of ideas, plans, innovations, and perspectives related to the development, commercialisation, marketing, and regulation of new lighting technologies in China and round the world from automakers, researchers, regulators, academics, practitioners, and Tier-1 and -2 suppliers.

The workshop proceeded on 23 April with a keynote of Naoya Fujimoto, General Manager of Exterior & Interior engineering at Nissan. He presented lighting innovations linked to styling.

Following this keynote event, four OEMs presented in the first session: Audi and Mercedes-Benz from Germany, and Qoros and Great Wall from China presenting their visions of the automotive industry from the lighting standpoint. Wonderful videos were presented to highlight their message.
The second session, chaired by noted expert Ralf Schäfer, focused on HID, LED, and OLED and their trends.
High level experts from SVW, OSRAM and Philips gave their vision of the development and application of light sources emphasizing the fast and significant change in this technology.

The afternoon started with a panel session on regulations, chaired by GTB President Geoff Draper, with 4 lectures from CATARC, JASIC, ISOQA, and GTB who presented their view on regulations in their area. These 4 lectures were followed by a discussion between 10 worldwide experts on lighting regulation. Interesting information, summarizing the status of the worldwide regulations by Geoff Draper, was presented and is reported here.
The fourth session had a big docket of 7 lectures from the main Tier 1 suppliers: Kamislav Fadel from AL started with a top-flight presentation on the challenges of the increase of car models and technologies. Bill Moore followed focusing on lighting trends in China, and then the ever-charismatic Rainer Neumann talked about the trends of lighting particularly in China. Sally Zhou from Xingyu sketched the development of local car- and set-makers and gave interesting information about current situation of local brands and future prospects of the industry. We liked very much the lectures of Olivier Barthomeuf from Ichikoh on thermal constraints, and Takashi Sato from Stanley, on an innovative optical system and a hybrid LED/Laser system. All information is in this report.

One day later, the fifth session started with the surprising lecture of Shanghai Koito which showed their high level of know-how; then Mobis presented the improvement of AFS lighting using GPS info to anticipate the movement of lighting actuators and at the end of the session Michael Flannagan emphasizes the challenges of lighting to decrease pedestrians deaths at night.
We closed the workshop with interesting presentations from Tier 2 suppliers showing their latest technologies in components, simulation and process.

New for this workshop: a DVN microsite with most of the lectures, accessible from the main DVN website. So, the reader of the report will have in same time, the summary and the lecture.

 
Geneva international Motor Show PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 02 April 2013

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Though it might not have been as grand a show as Paris or Detroit, the 2013 Geneva auto show emphasised some impressive innovation and novelty from automakers all over the world.

Several important firsts were on display in production cars , though fewer than usual. Notable were three French models: the Renault Captur, the Peugeot 2008, and the Citroën Technospace—as well as the Alfa Romeo Coupé 4C, Opel Cascada, Honda NSX, Hyundai SantaFe, and Mercedes-Benz C-Class.


Renault Captur

Citroën Technospace
 
Opel Cascada

Honda NSX
 
Hyundai SantaFe

E-Class

 Hyper-expensive cars were the great success of the show with Lamborghini Venenos (at a frosty €3 million apiece), the McLaren P1, the Ferrari LaFerrari, the Maserati Quattroporte, the Bentley Flying Spur, and the Rolls-Royce Wraith.


Lamborghini Venenos

LaFerrari
 
McLaren P1

 But again concept cars are the real stars of this 2013 Geneva auto show. We liked Audi's A3 g-tron, BMW's i3, the Honda Civic Tourer and NSX, Kia's Provo concept with its visible dynamic light, and the Mitsubishi GR-HEV.


Kia Provo concept
 
Honda Civic Tourer concept

 In the eco-car realm, Volkswagen's LX1, the Audi A3 e-Tron, and Peugeot's Concept Hybrid were the stars.


Volkswagen LX1

Audi A3 e-Tron

The Volkswagen Golf was awarded the car of the year by a jury of 58 European journalists, joining the Opel Ampera in 2012 and the Nissan leaf in 2011.


Volkswagen Golf

This report is narrowly focused on the vision systems of the vehicles on display. Around 100 photographs in 50 pages give a “you-are-there” look at the new vision systems and on the details.

 
2014 DVN PARIS WORKSHOP REPORT PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 22 February 2013

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  • The DVN Workshop of February 2014 was held at Paris, France with 220 attendees from OEMs, tier-1 and -2 suppliers, researchers, regulators, and individuals who develop, build, specify, and regulate vehicle lighting around the world. The participants exhibited a very high degree of excitement and future vision.
    DVN asked worldwide experts to share their vision, predictions, and desires about automotive lighting technologies in the 2020-25 timeframe. Eighteen exceptionally stimulating presentations and three panel discussions illustrated how each contributor sees the technology and how they might be focusing their choices on investments in engineering, materials, people, and production.
    In every presentation a common thread appeared: automotive lighting has dramatically changed over the years and its future will become more complex and interesting with styles continuing to become more diverse and innovative. Today in 2014, the design and creative styling is already greatly influencing how lighting will be engineered and in many cases, posing a significant engineering challenge to incorporate the visual cues of the design and deliver it to production. The challenges OEMs face in delivering future lighting innovation tied to their brands is daunting but poses a real opportunity for all.
  • After an opening greeting and welcome from DVN Editor in Chief  Hector Fratty who outlined the workshop’s rubric and docket,  five OEMs presented in the first session: Audi, BMW, Opel, Volkswagen, and  Renault who shared their visions, concerns, and views of lighting innovation with emphasis on the fast and significant change and growth in this technology. This was followed by the keynote speech. A lively question-and-discussion period rounded out the first session.
  • Session 2 was primarily focused on six tier-1 suppliers: AL, Hella, Varroc, Koito, ZKW, and Valeo.  They explained how the speed of innovation will continue to increase, challenging everyone in term of resources, cost, time to market, and legislation.Static LED ADB System for glare-free high beam is the trend and the preferred solution for the future, though regulatory barriers remain (e.g., North America). New light sources such as OLED and laser on top of numerous LED sources will lead to an ever growing complexity which should lead to a standardisation of modules.

    Session 3 started in the afternoon and the area of focus was the LED manufactures.  Each shared a prediction of how LED light sources will evolve and grow in sophistication and how they must stay in step with the fast pace of design that keeps pushing innovation and product uniqueness. Global LED giants Nichia, Osram, and Philips touched on LED package designs, intelligent lighting sources, and the challenges of laser diodes and the significant interest in their possibilities. Later, a solid technical presentation from Chandrajit Basu (Hannover Centre for Optical Technologies) on laser technology and an interesting talk by Jacqueline Brückner (Centre for
    Organic Materials and Electronic Devices) on the possibilities for flexible OLED displays and how they might influence lighting. Finally, GTB President Geoff Draper made an excellent and visionary presentation about the challenges of international harmonisation of regulations. He warned of possible organisational changes which could affect regulatory processes and outlined the critical needs that must be addressed urgently.

    This report summarises all 18 presentations, with links to the original lectures. At the end are pictures of attendees, exhibitors and speakers. 

 

Hotel du Collectionneur

hotel le collectionneur paris

L'Hotel du Collectionneur- Arc de Triomphe is in the Golden Triangle of Paris, 500 meters from the Arch de Trimphe, and one of the few 5 star hotels in Paris. For more details, goto: www.hotelducollectionneur.com

 

 
VISION 2012 Congress Report PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 06 November 2012

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This report is written primarily for automotive lighting and DA experts who were not present at VISION 2012 or who may have missed important lectures there. In around 80 pages, we précis and analyse the main presentations.

This year, VISION's lectures, posters, night-drive demonstrations, booths, and for the first time technological presentations, combined to make an exceptional congress on new technologies with emphasis on the unprecedented speed and proliferation of new and newly-mature technologies and techniques. Around 400 people attended.


The lectures cover:
LED technology and its continuing improvements in optics, thermics, electronics, architecture, and power savings;
Adaptive light systems, evolving very fast with the arrival of cameras to implement intelligent automatic beam selection with the several corresponding adaptive systems, high beam assistant, horizontal and vertical adaptive cutoffs, and glare free high beam;
Systems combining LED and adaptive light including LED arrays to produce AFS, matrix-beam systems, and spot marking light functions;
Driver assistance systems combining ADAS and lighting

We were impressed by the charismatic presentations by Rainer Neumann, Michael Hamm, Michael Kleinkes, the fantastic slides and video of Carlos Elvira, Ernst-Olaf Rosenhahn, Thomas Reiners, Masaru Sasaki, and the technical lectures of Benoist Reiss, Pierre Albou, and Michael Scholl, amongst others.

In the second part of the report, we present the drive night tests, with the main strong points:
• Performance differential with HID or LED is such that driving at night in bad weather with legal halogen headlamps can legitimately be considered dangerous;
• LED headlamps have evolved significantly since the 2010 demonstration, and can produce a good light effectively equal to HID in terms of coverage and beam flux, which permits safe driving at night in bad weather;

• Glare-free high beam is at long last a dependable, high-performance feature which permits maximum possible seeing range at all times for the driver, even in traffic.


In the third part, we summarise the best technical presentations, presentations introduced for the first time at VISION this year.

The report closes with pictures of the VISION 2012 lighting community gathering and exchanging ideas about automotive lighting.

 
Mondial Paris 2012 Motor Show PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 16 October 2012

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This year's Paris auto show centred on production cars. There were fewer concept cars than usual. In this report, Driving Vision News present the new cars exhibited in Paris and their lighting equipment design, safety, and styling.

Some of the most innovative production-car lighting we found was on the Audi A3, BMW 7, Mercedes A-Class, Ford Mondeo, Seat Leon, Citroën DS3 Cabrio, Opel Adam, Renault Clio, and VW Golf.


Renault Clio

Volkswagen Golf

Ford Mondeo

Seat Leon

Despite the relatively small population of concept cars, we found innovative lighting on the Audi Crosslane coupé, the Lexus LF-CC, the BMW Active Tourer, Peugeot ONYX, Nissan Terra, and Ssangyong e-XIV.


Audi Q2

BMW Tourer

Peugeot 2008

Panamera wagon

The main takeaway points for this Paris 2012 Mondial are:

•  Compared to the 2010 show, totally focused on eco-friendly cars, the 2012 show was more a display of automakers' strategies to cope with the European market downturn and to respond to market growth in other regions round the world.

•  Technologically-focused innovation in highly visible aspects of vehicle design—none such as lighting!—with market-matched models and equipment, are crucial to every automaker's long-term success.

•  Thanks to the unlimited styling and appearance-differentiation possibilities of LEDs and related technology and technique, cars presented at this year's Mondial prove there is room for new lighting technologies even in a down-trending market provided they help to reach the hearts of potential customers—a vital lever alongside reaching their minds via improved performance and safety to persuade them to buy.

•  Several new important mass market production car models are launched with LED headlamps, namely Ford Mondeo and Seat Leon, now standing side by side with premium BMW 7 Series and Audi A3. We can see a developing picture of the wide variety of designs possible with LED technology.

•  Stylish and advanced HID headlamps outnumber all other front light technologies displayed on premium and midrange cars. HID technology is getting a renewal boost thanks to the arrival of intelligent lighting features more practicably implemented with HID than with halogen, and lower-cost, reduced-wattage HID systems.

•  Stylish LED rear lamps are increasingly prevalent on cars with LED or HID headlamps.

•  Car makers like Ford, Chevrolet, and Volkswagen emphasise the importance of styling. The designers explain their work with videos using sketches, slides and simulations.

•  Audi are still the primary car maker to push forward lighting as a technological differentiation factor, but Hyundai-Kia also understand lighting is a great lever of perceived value and they invest a lot in it.

•  Several car makers like Renault, Volkswagen, and Opel had their entire exhibition area focused on the presentation of their newly-launched cars.

 


 

 
DVN Tokyo Workshop PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 24 July 2012

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After Stuttgart in 2009, Paris in 2010 and 2011, Rochester in January 2012, the fifth DVN workshop was held on July 4th in a wonderful location, the Tokyo Westin Hotel. The 70 pages of the Tokyo workshop report held on 4 July 2012 are meant for all our DVN Gold members, including those who could not attend this exceptional event, and will brief you on the exchange of ideas, plans, innovations, and perspectives from automakers, researchers, regulators, academics, practitioners, and Tier-1 and -2 lighting suppliers about the introduction of new lighting technologies in Japan and elsewhere.

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